CMSC Advanced Skills Series

An Online “Deeper Dive” into Self-Compassion Practice

For those who have had the opportunity to take some form of MSC training, you will have begun to appreciate and encounter the many levels and nuances of self-compassion practice. The Center for Mindful Self-Compassion (CMSC) will be offering a series of “deeper dives” into self-compassion in the year ahead, offered by world-recognized experts in the topic, intended to give participants an opportunity to deepen and enrich their existing self-compassion practice through exploring special topics.

The intention with this series of online workshops is to provide opportunities for people to further explore some of the more challenging and potentially fruitful aspects of self-compassion. These workshops are highly experiential and practical for those wishing to deepen their practice.

Embodying
Self-Compassion

 

Presented by Ann Saffi-Biasetti, Richa Gawande, Fresh Lev White and Marissa Knox
May 1
9 am – 3pm (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

The
Self-Compassionate Man

 

Presented by Daniel Ellenberg
and Steven Hickman
June 17 and 19
9 am – Noon (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

Fierce
Self-Compassion

 

Presented by
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
September 18 and 25
9 am – Noon (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

Self-Compassion:
An Antidote to Shame

 

Presented by
Christopher Germer, Ph.D.
November 6 and 13
9 am – Noon (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

Embodying Self-Compassion

Presented by Ann Saffi-Biasetti, Richa Gawande, Fresh Lev White and Marissa Knox
Saturday, May 1 from 9 am to 3 pm Pacific Time (Registration opening in March)

 

“and i said to my body. softly. ‘i want to be your friend.’ it took a long breath. and replied ‘i have been waiting my whole life for this.” ― Nayyirah Waheed

 

Embodying Self-Compassion is a day-long experience where we will learn to meet and embrace our whole being during these extraordinary times. As we go through life, we often become disconnected from our bodies, whether it is through trauma, illness, objectification, or a cultural expectation to focus on our minds at the expense of our physical and energetic selves. It is through remembering our bodies and embodying our wholeness that we can tap into the depth of wisdom offered by the three elements of self-compassion: mindfulness, common humanity, and self-kindness
When we restore this connection with our bodies, we also restore our sense of interconnectedness with the earth and with each other, and vice-versa. Being embodied re-aligns us with nature and the rhythm of life, giving us access to more resources to meet our pain and difficulty with grace and compassion.

Together we will explore what it means to have compassion in and for the body. Through this spacious and nurturing 6-hour retreat, we will experience somatic practices, guided meditations, and reflective writing to reveal deeper layers of self-compassion within us. Come home to the sacred ground of your being and embody the truth of all that you are.

Registration: Coming soon!

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:
⦁ define what embodiment means to them.
⦁ apply at least three resources of grounding through the self-compassion and somatic practices offered.
⦁ identify the three components of body forgiveness
⦁ utilize gratitude as a daily practice.
⦁ describe how the three components of self-compassion, kindness, mindfulness, and common humanity relate to embodiment.

Ann Biasetti

Ann has been a practicing Psychotherapist for over 29 years. She has a private practice in Saratoga Springs, NY, where she specializes in somatic psychotherapy, and is an eating disorder specialist. She has a PhD in Transpersonal Psychology and is licensed as a Clinical Social Worker.  She is a certified Mindfulness teacher, Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) Teacher, and a Certified Yoga Therapist (C-IAYT). She is an author, speaker and teacher of self-compassion and somatic interventions in eating disorder recovery, embodiment, women’s empowerment, and body image. She has led well received workshops at Kripalu, Shambhala Mountain Center, and has led training workshops for professionals through PESI and in her Befriending Your Body (BFYB) certification program for eating disorder recovery. Her first book, Befriending Your Body: A Self-Compassionate Approach to Freeing Yourself from Disordered Eating, was released through Shambhala publications in August, 2018.

Fresh “Lev” White

Fresh “Lev” White is a love and compassionate activist. He offers mindfulness, coaching, mediation, and diversity trainings as tools for shifting towards more authentic, conscious, and passionate living to individuals, households, and professional teams. As a certified coach, and professional trainer, Lev has offered over 200 diversity trainings in the San Francisco Bay Area and Beyond. He earned his coaching and leadership certifications through the Co-Active Training Institute. Lev is mindfully grounded at the East Bay Meditation Center, and a graduate of Spirit Rock’s Community Dharma Leadership program. Lev also offers secular mindfulness and nonsecular meditation, and talks on Compassion in both corporate and private settings. He credits his ability to reach diverse audiences to his years growing up in diverse communities in New York. Learn more on LinkedIn: “Fresh “Lev” White

Marissa C. Knox

Marissa C. Knox, PhD is a teacher, researcher, and writer focused on cultivating holistic and interconnected wellbeing and resilience through mindful awareness, self-compassion, and gratitude. In her work as a trained Mindful Self-Compassion teacher, certified Embody Love Movement facilitator, and Level 1 iRest® Yoga Nidra teacher, Marissa supports others to embody their values, remember their wholeness, and live with integrity and in alignment with nature. Marissa has facilitated self-compassion programs for educators, students, therapists, healthcare professionals, and parents. She also helped adapt the curriculum for the Self-Compassion for Healthcare Communities (SCHC) program. Marissa is currently teaching a course called Mindfulness, Compassion, and the Self at the University of Texas at Austin. You can learn more about Marissa on her website: https://marissa-knox.com/

Richa Gawande 

Richa is interested in community conversations and participatory action research about the impact of stress, culture and illness on the body and the ways in which connecting to our bodies and the earth body with self-compassion and in community can facilitate healing, joy, and justice. Richa is a trained Mindful Self-Compassion teacher, Co-Director of the Mindfulness Training for Primary Care teacher training pathway, and Research Scientist at the Center for Mindfulness and Compassion (CMC), and Research Associate at Harvard Medical School. She has been teaching mindfulness and compassion groups at CMC and elsewhere for four years. She is committed to working within and towards a larger ethical framework that is sensitive and responsive to the importance of social justice, community, story and culture. Richa has a background in biology and public health. She has spiritual roots in Hinduism and Buddhism and in connections to nature and music.

The Self-Compassionate Man

Presented by Daniel Ellenberg and Steven Hickman
June 17 and 19, 2021 from 9-Noon Pacific (Registration open in March)
Format: The workshop will be comprised of two separate 3-hour sessions

 

This 6-hour workshop is intended for all genders and focuses upon the power and potential for fostering self-compassion in men. Looking deeply at the concept of masculinity and the constraints of the traditional male role, the session aims to engage all participants in exploring their own embedded notions of these constructs and how those largely unconscious attitudes and beliefs have helped shape our behaviors as men, parents of boys, and partners of men. Join Daniel Ellenberg and Steven Hickman in this reflective experiential workshop that will also offer some practical approaches to begin to courageously shift the norms and biases of our society to free men to reach their full potential as empowered, emotionally adept and fulfilled people through the practice of self-compassion and embracing their full identities.

Overcoming traditional gender roles that have often been recipes for shame, anxiety, alienation and various forms of bad behavior, entails the cultivation of a safe and brave inner space. The workshop combines two important aspects of personal growth for men: how to fully embrace their strengths and also bring kindness and understanding to difficulties through self-compassion. The program features several reflective and meditative exercises aimed at helping participants discover their own implicit biases and embedded cultural norms as a means of learning to transcend them. For men, the workshop may begin a process of exploration and growth that requires courage and commitment. For people who support and care for men, this can be an eye-opening experience in finding ways to avoid perpetuating old, limiting patterns and empowering them to break free to achieve all that is possible when we are self-compassionate and aware.

Registration: Coming soon!

Learning Objectives

Participants in the workshop will:
⦁ Explore and identify the assumptions of the traditional male role
⦁ Reflect on individual and cultural biases based on the traditional male role
⦁ Identify ways in which our biases have caused problems and suffering
⦁ Apply self-compassion practice to working with difficult emotions
⦁ Experiment with embracing personal strengths as a foundation for growth and change

Who should attend

Men and people who support, care for or love them. This workshop is appropriate for individuals who already have some experience practicing self-compassion and/or mindfulness, and it is not appropriate for those who are brand new to the concept of self-compassion.  It is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals. For those new to self-compassion, attendance at the 3-hour Primer in Self-Compassion workshop described above will qualify you to attend this workshop.

Daniel Ellenberg, PhD

Daniel Ellenberg, PhD is a co-founder of Relationships That Work®, founder/director of Strength with Heart® men’s groups and workshops, and a principal in Rewire Leadership Institute®. In his work as a leadership coach, communication consultant, licensed psychotherapist, seminar leader, and group facilitator, he helps people create meaningful, inspiring, and resilient personal and professional lives. Daniel co-authored Lovers for Life: Creating Lasting Passion, Trust, and True Partnership with Judith Bell, contributed to The Communication Path, and Mastering the Art of Success, Volume 8. He is in private practice in San Francisco and Marin County. He is a board member of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom. Daniel specializes in helping people create more authentic, compassionate relationships with themselves and others. He believes that people often learn best when they laugh most. He has led workshops in various places, including Esalen Institute, Spirit Rock, Association of Humanistic Psychology, Stanford University, and NASA. At NASA, he co-created and delivered a specially designed resilience training program. He has been interviewed on radio and television, particularly focusing on the themes of mindful relationships and male psychological transformation.

Steven Hickman, Psy.D.

Dr. Steven Hickman is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Executive Director of the non-profit Center for Mindful Self-Compassion, a co-developer of the teacher training in Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) and a Certified MSC Teacher. Dr. Hickman is also the Founding Director of the UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. He is a retired Associate Clinical Professor in the UCSD Department of Family Medicine and Public Health. Steven is also a Certified teacher of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and is a teacher trainer in MBCT and MBSR as well. His area of specialty is the training of teachers of mindfulness and self-compassion, and he has a particular passion and experience for sharing this work with men and with first-responders. Together with Daniel Ellenberg he has developed the Ultimate Courage: Self-Compassion Workshop for Men. He is married and has three young adult children, affording him ample opportunities to practice what he teaches.

Fierce Self-Compassion

Presented by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
This course will be available again on September 18th and 25th, 7am-10am PST. Registration opening in July.

 

Since the publication of Kristin Neff’s ground-breaking book Self-Compassion, there has been a surge of interest in the science and practice of self-compassion, particularly in clinical settings. But that has often focused on the tender, nurturing aspect of self-compassion, which involves “being with” ourselves in a compassionate way. We comfort and soothe ourselves when in pain, just as we might for a friend who is struggling. We give ourselves our own kind attention and care rather than cutting ourselves down with self-criticism. And we validate our pain, acknowledging that our suffering is worthy of attention.

But self-compassion can be fierce as well as tender.

Fierce self-compassion involves taking action in the world to protect, provide and motivate ourselves to alleviate our suffering. It means saying “no” to others who are hurting us – drawing our boundaries firmly.  Or saying “no” to our own harmful behaviors, so that we can be safe and healthy. It means giving ourselves what we genuinely need – mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually – without subordinating our needs to those of others, so we can be authentic and fulfilled. And it means motivating ourselves to reach our goals or make needed changes in our lives.

This unique workshop explores the skills of both types of self-compassion – the fierce as well as the tender. Led by Dr. Neff, the pioneering researcher of self-compassion, it will not only cover scientific findings on the topic but also provide concrete practices drawn from Dr. Neff’s empirically supported Mindful Self-Compassion program for use in daily life. The program will include a satisfying mix of experiential learning and science-based insights. It will be relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals.

Throughout the program, Dr. Neff will reveal how, in order to be truly self-compassionate – in order to be whole – we need to integrate both sides of self-compassion: If we are tender without ferocity, we risk becoming complacent or disempowered; if we are ferocious without tenderness, we risk becoming hostile, selfish, or perfectionistic. Like a tree with a solid trunk and flexible branches, we need to stand strong while still embracing others as part of an interdependent whole.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This workshop is appropriate for individuals who already have some experience practicing self-compassion and/or mindfulness, and it is not appropriate for those who are brand new to the concept of self-compassion.  It is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals.

For those new to self-compassion, attendance at the 3-hour Primer in Self-Compassion workshop described above will qualify you to attend this workshop.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.  Identify the different ways that yin and yang self-compassion can be expressed
2.  Apply self-compassion in situations requiring protection
3.  Describe the constructive and destructive features of anger
4. Assess personal needs and meet them with self-compassion
5.  Compare and integrate yin and yang self-compassion

Continuing Education Credit will be offered for this Training

Psychologists: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This course offers 5.5 CE Credit.

California licensed MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, LCSWs: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. 5.5 CE Credit may be applied to your license renewal through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. For those licensed outside California, please check with your local licensing board to determine if CE Credit is accepted.

Nurses: UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP16351, for 6.5 contact hours.  

Continuing Education credit fees are $45 per Certificate. They can be purchased during registration.

Kristin Neff received her doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley, studying moral development. She did two years of postdoctoral study at the University of Denver studying self-concept development. She is currently an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin.

During Kristin’s last year of graduate school she became interested in Buddhism and has been practicing meditation in the Insight Meditation tradition ever since. While doing her post-doctoral work she decided to conduct research on self-compassion – a central construct in Buddhist psychology and one that had not yet been examined empirically. Kristin is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, creating a scale to measure the construct over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic, she is author of the book Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, released by William Morrow.

In conjunction with her colleague Dr. Chris Germer, she has developed an empirically supported training program called Mindful Self-Compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. They co-authored The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook as well as Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program: A Guide for Professionals, both published by Guilford. She is also co-founder and board president of the nonprofit Center for Mindful Self-Compassion.

Self-Compassion: An Antidote to Shame

Presented by Christopher Germer, Ph.D.
This course will be available again on November 6 and 13, 7am-10am PST. Registration opening in July.

Four 1-Hour Mentor and Affinity Groups – 1pm Pacific / 3pm Central / 4pm Eastern
March, 2, 3, 4, 5
General Mentor Groups
BIPOC, LGBTQI2S+, Ability Challenged Affinity Groups

 

“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”  – William James

Shame is everywhere. Whenever we feel bad about ourselves, for whatever reason, there is a touch of shame. Shame can occur when we feel judged by others or when we judge ourselves. It can happen when we do something wrong and when we’re entirely innocent of wrongdoing. Shame strikes at the core of our being but has nothing to do with who we really are.

Shame is the most difficult human emotion. What makes shame so challenging is that most of us would rather do anything than feel shame. Our first instinct is to “go small, go silent, or go away.” Sometimes we go on the attack, criticizing ourselves or others. We may also try to numb ourselves by escaping into unhealthy behaviors. When shame is present in our lives, there’s often no one home to work with it.

Self-compassion is an antidote to shame. It’s the opposite of shame—self-kindness instead of self-criticism, common humanity instead of isolation, and mindfulness instead of rumination. The process of alleviating shame begins by recognizing that shame is an innocent emotion—it arises from the universal wish to be loved. If we didn’t wish to be loved, we wouldn’t feel shame. The next step is to give ourselves the compassion we so desperately need—self-compassion.

Please join Chris Germer, PhD, clinical psychologist and co-developer of the Mindful Self-Compassion training, for a 6-hour, online, experiential workshop including talks, meditation, research, exercises, and discussion. We will take a fresh, non-pathological look at shame through the eyes of compassion.

In this program, we will explore the nature of shame, it’s causes (including discrimination and social oppression), and learn simple skills to detect shame in our daily lives and transform it, safely and effectively, through the power of self-compassion. Meditation practitioners will be able to integrate these tools into their contemplative practices and psychotherapists will learn new skills to work with shame in clinical settings.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This workshop is appropriate for individuals who already have some experience practicing self-compassion and/or mindfulness, and it is not appropriate for those who are brand new to the concept of self-compassion.  It is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals. Participants can expect to touch shame and other challenging emotions in this workshop, so they agree in advance to take responsibility for their emotional safety and wellbeing. This workshop is equally relevant for healthcare professionals and members of the general public.

Mentor and Affinity Groups are part of this learning experience!
General Mentor Groups are open to everyone.
BIPOC, LGBTQI2S+, Ability Challenged Affinity Groups are open to those who share your identity. All groups offer opportunities to deepen and apply learnings into your life – in community.

For those new to self-compassion, attendance at the 3-hour Primer in Self-Compassion workshop described above will qualify you to attend this workshop.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Summarize the theory and research on shame
2. Identify the evolutionary and developmental origins of shame
3. Apply the three components of self-compassion to the experience of shame
4. Integrate self-compassion skills for shame in daily life
5. Teach simple practices to clients to alleviate shame

Continuing Education Credit will be offered for this Training

Psychologists: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This course offers 5.5 CE Credit.

California licensed MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, LCSWs: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. 5.5 CE Credit may be applied to your license renewal through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. For those licensed outside California, please check with your local licensing board to determine if CE Credit is accepted.

Nurses: UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP16351, for 6.5 contact hours.  

Continuing Education credit fees are $45 per Certificate. They can be purchased during registration.

Chris Germer, PhD is a clinical psychologist and lecturer on psychiatry (part-time) at Harvard Medical School. He co-developed the Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) program with Kristin Neff in 2010 and MSC has since been taught to over 100,000 people worldwide. They co-authored two books on MSC, The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook and Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program.

Chris spends most of his time lecturing and leading workshops around the world on mindfulness and self-compassion. He is also the author of The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion; he co-edited two influential volumes on therapy, Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, and Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy; and he maintains a small private practice in Arlington, Massachusetts, USA.

Cancellation Policy

Full refunds if cancelling 2 weeks before the workshop starts. No refunds thereafter. (Some exceptions may be made for compassionate reasons.)