CMSC Advanced Skills Series

An Online “Deeper Dive” into Self-Compassion Practice

For those who have had the opportunity to take some form of MSC training, you will have begun to appreciate and encounter the many levels and nuances of self-compassion practice. The Center for Mindful Self-Compassion (CMSC) will be offering a series of “deeper dives” into self-compassion in the year ahead, offered by world-recognized experts in the topic, intended to give participants an opportunity to deepen and enrich their existing self-compassion practice through exploring special topics.

The intention with this series of online workshops is to provide opportunities for people to further explore some of the more challenging and potentially fruitful aspects of self-compassion. These workshops are highly experiential and practical for those wishing to deepen their practice.

A Primer in Mindful
Self-Compassion

 

Presented by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
January 19, 2021
9 am – 1 pm (Pacific Time)
4 hours total

$95.00

Fierce
Self-Compassion

 

Presented by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
February 2 and 4
9 am – Noon (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

Self-Compassion:
An Antidote to Shame

 

Presented by Christopher Germer, Ph.D.
March 2 and 4
9 am – Noon (Pacific Time)
6 hours total

$175.00

Combination Fees

Attend More Than One and Save!

Two Advanced Topics Only: $300 (a $50 savings)

Primer + Both Advanced Topics: $345 (a $100 savings)

A Primer in Mindful Self-Compassion

Presented by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
One 4 Hour Session   — 9-1 Pacific, 11-3 Central, 12-4 Eastern, 1700-2100 UTC
January 19, 2021

 

Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a good friend we cared about. Rather than continually judging and evaluating ourselves, self-compassion involves generating kindness toward ourselves as imperfect humans, and learning to be present with the inevitable struggles of life with greater ease. It motivates us to make needed changes in our lives not because we’re worthless or inadequate, but because we care about ourselves and want to lessen our suffering. This workshop will provide some of the essential ideas and key practices of the 8-week Mindful Self-Compassion in a brief format. It will provide simple tools for responding in a kind, compassionate way when we experience painful emotions. Through discussion and experiential exercises, you will gain practical skills to help bring self-compassion into you daily life. You will learn how to stop being so hard on yourself; handle difficult emotions with greater ease; and motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism. This course is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals.

If you are new to self-compassion then this is a great place to start, and your attendance will qualify you to attend the Advanced Skills Workshops listed below.

Fierce Self-Compassion

Presented by Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
Two 3 Hour Sessions (6 hours total) — 9 am Pacific/11 am Central/Noon Eastern
February 2 and 4
Registration for Fierce Self-Compassion closes on January 31 at Noon Pacific Time

Since the publication of Kristin Neff’s ground-breaking book Self-Compassion, there has been a surge of interest in the science and practice of self-compassion, particularly in clinical settings. But that has often focused on the tender, nurturing aspect of self-compassion, which involves “being with” ourselves in a compassionate way. We comfort and soothe ourselves when in pain, just as we might for a friend who is struggling. We give ourselves our own kind attention and care rather than cutting ourselves down with self-criticism. And we validate our pain, acknowledging that our suffering is worthy of attention.

But self-compassion can be fierce as well as tender.

Fierce self-compassion involves taking action in the world to protect, provide and motivate ourselves to alleviate our suffering. It means saying “no” to others who are hurting us – drawing our boundaries firmly.  Or saying “no” to our own harmful behaviors, so that we can be safe and healthy. It means giving ourselves what we genuinely need – mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually – without subordinating our needs to those of others, so we can be authentic and fulfilled. And it means motivating ourselves to reach our goals or make needed changes in our lives.

This unique workshop explores the skills of both types of self-compassion – the fierce as well as the tender. Led by Dr. Neff, the pioneering researcher of self-compassion, it will not only cover scientific findings on the topic but also provide concrete practices drawn from Dr. Neff’s empirically supported Mindful Self-Compassion program for use in daily life. The program will include a satisfying mix of experiential learning and science-based insights. It will be relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals.

Throughout the program, Dr. Neff will reveal how, in order to be truly self-compassionate – in order to be whole – we need to integrate both sides of self-compassion: If we are tender without ferocity, we risk becoming complacent or disempowered; if we are ferocious without tenderness, we risk becoming hostile, selfish, or perfectionistic. Like a tree with a solid trunk and flexible branches, we need to stand strong while still embracing others as part of an interdependent whole.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This workshop is appropriate for individuals who already have some experience practicing self-compassion and/or mindfulness, and it is not appropriate for those who are brand new to the concept of self-compassion.  It is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals.

For those new to self-compassion, attendance at the 3-hour Primer in Self-Compassion workshop described above will qualify you to attend this workshop.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.  Identify the different ways that yin and yang self-compassion can be expressed
2.  Apply self-compassion in situations requiring protection
3.  Describe the constructive and destructive features of anger
4. Assess personal needs and meet them with self-compassion
5.  Compare and integrate yin and yang self-compassion

Continuing Education Credit will be offered for this Training

Psychologists: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This course offers 5.5 CE Credit.

California licensed MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, LCSWs: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. 5.5 CE Credit may be applied to your license renewal through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. For those licensed outside California, please check with your local licensing board to determine if CE Credit is accepted.

Nurses: UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP16351, for 6.5 contact hours.  

Continuing Education credit fees are $45 per Certificate. They can be purchased during registration.

Kristin Neff received her doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley, studying moral development. She did two years of postdoctoral study at the University of Denver studying self-concept development. She is currently an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin.

During Kristin’s last year of graduate school she became interested in Buddhism and has been practicing meditation in the Insight Meditation tradition ever since. While doing her post-doctoral work she decided to conduct research on self-compassion – a central construct in Buddhist psychology and one that had not yet been examined empirically. Kristin is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, creating a scale to measure the construct over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic, she is author of the book Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, released by William Morrow.

In conjunction with her colleague Dr. Chris Germer, she has developed an empirically supported training program called Mindful Self-Compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. They co-authored The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook as well as Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program: A Guide for Professionals, both published by Guilford. She is also co-founder and board president of the nonprofit Center for Mindful Self-Compassion.

Self-Compassion: An Antidote to Shame

Presented by Christopher Germer, Ph.D.
Two 3 Hour Sessions (6 hours total) — 9 am Pacific/11 am Central/Noon Eastern
March 2 and 4

 

“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”  – William James

Shame is everywhere. Whenever we feel bad about ourselves, for whatever reason, there is a touch of shame. Shame can occur when we feel judged by others or when we judge ourselves. It can happen when we do something wrong and when we’re entirely innocent of wrongdoing. Shame strikes at the core of our being but has nothing to do with who we really are.

Shame is the most difficult human emotion. What makes shame so challenging is that most of us would rather do anything than feel shame. Our first instinct is to “go small, go silent, or go away.” Sometimes we go on the attack, criticizing ourselves or others. We may also try to numb ourselves by escaping into unhealthy behaviors. When shame is present in our lives, there’s often no one home to work with it.

Self-compassion is an antidote to shame. It’s the opposite of shame—self-kindness instead of self-criticism, common humanity instead of isolation, and mindfulness instead of rumination. The process of alleviating shame begins by recognizing that shame is an innocent emotion—it arises from the universal wish to be loved. If we didn’t wish to be loved, we wouldn’t feel shame. The next step is to give ourselves the compassion we so desperately need—self-compassion.

Please join Chris Germer, PhD, clinical psychologist and co-developer of the Mindful Self-Compassion training, for a 6-hour, online, experiential workshop including talks, meditation, research, exercises, and discussion. We will take a fresh, non-pathological look at shame through the eyes of compassion.

In this program, we will explore the nature of shame, it’s causes (including discrimination and social oppression), and learn simple skills to detect shame in our daily lives and transform it, safely and effectively, through the power of self-compassion. Meditation practitioners will be able to integrate these tools into their contemplative practices and psychotherapists will learn new skills to work with shame in clinical settings.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This workshop is appropriate for individuals who already have some experience practicing self-compassion and/or mindfulness, and it is not appropriate for those who are brand new to the concept of self-compassion.  It is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals. Participants can expect to touch shame and other challenging emotions in this workshop, so they agree in advance to take responsibility for their emotional safety and wellbeing. This workshop is equally relevant for healthcare professionals and members of the general public.

For those new to self-compassion, attendance at the 3-hour Primer in Self-Compassion workshop described above will qualify you to attend this workshop.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1. Summarize the theory and research on shame
2. Identify the evolutionary and developmental origins of shame
3. Apply the three components of self-compassion to the experience of shame
4. Integrate self-compassion skills for shame in daily life
5. Teach simple practices to clients to alleviate shame

Continuing Education Credit will be offered for this Training

Psychologists: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This course offers 5.5 CE Credit.

California licensed MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, LCSWs: Continuing Education Credit for this program is provided by UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness. The UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. 5.5 CE Credit may be applied to your license renewal through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. For those licensed outside California, please check with your local licensing board to determine if CE Credit is accepted.

Nurses: UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP16351, for 6.5 contact hours.  

Continuing Education credit fees are $45 per Certificate. They can be purchased during registration.

Chris Germer, PhD is a clinical psychologist and lecturer on psychiatry (part-time) at Harvard Medical School. He co-developed the Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) program with Kristin Neff in 2010 and MSC has since been taught to over 100,000 people worldwide. They co-authored two books on MSC, The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook and Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program.

Chris spends most of his time lecturing and leading workshops around the world on mindfulness and self-compassion. He is also the author of The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion; he co-edited two influential volumes on therapy, Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, and Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy; and he maintains a small private practice in Arlington, Massachusetts, USA.

Cancellation Policy

Full refunds if cancelling 2 weeks before the workshop starts. No refunds thereafter. (Some exceptions may be made for compassionate reasons.)